Monday, 8 August 2016

BIFA - what is the British International Freight Association?


Most professions have a trade association, set up to give them guidance and support as well as representation where needed. Freight Forwarding firms have their very own trade association - The British International Freight Association (BIFA), Of course, t ward shipping are members of this helpful body, which gives our clients confidence and also gives us support with training and development, specialist information and a lot more.

BIFA is the trade association for any UK-registered companies who are involved in the international movement of freight. Not just sea freight - BIFA is there for companies using any type transport to move freight around the world; air, road, rail and sea. Some members of BIFA are also involved with customs clearance and cross border controls.


What does this mean for our clients? Well, it gives you peace of mind that we will be trading under an internationally agreed set of standard trading conditions that are accepted and backed by the insurance sector.

If you’re an industry member like us, the experts at BIFA can be an invaluable source of support and education, with everything from a monthly newsletter updating members on anything important and relevant to freight forwarding, and if you’re looking for a freight forwarding company and want to ensure that they are a BIFA member, they have a website listing which is constantly updated.

BIFA also represents the interests of our industry in the media, and in recent weeks they have been calling on the government to start making decisions on air freight issues such as expanding and supporting the UK aviation industry in the wake of the Brexit vote.

We believe that being part of BIFA is a positive step for any businesses involved in freight forwarding and associated trades, and that membership helps t ward shipping to link in with BIFAs pursuit of excellence and quality in the transport and logistics sector.

For more information about BIFA, their members and what they do, take a look at the website at: http://www.bifa.org/

Tuesday, 14 June 2016

Be dazzled by the MV Fingal

You may have seen coverage of the unveiling of the MV Fingal, or Dazzle Ship, which left Leith at 0900 on Saturday 28th May and returned around 7pm the same day?

DazzleShip under Forth Bridge



Starting in April this year the ship has been transformed by a local artist into ‘Every Woman.’ We’re proud to confirm that t ward shipping limited were responsible for organising the movement of the ship last month – and didn’t it go well? We were busy behind the scenes preparing for the unveiling of the newly dazzled ship, booking the entire marine movement and making sure everything went smoothly on the day. We booked everything from the tugs, pilots and riggers to the tow master.
Dazzle Ships have been docked in London and Liverpool since 2014, and have become floating works of art for visitors and residents.  This Dazzle Ship definitely brought a stunning splash of colour to Leith docks, as it celebrated the role British women played in the First World War effort. The MV Fingal offers its own contemporary take on the “dazzle” technique, a technique which was used in the war where vessels were painted with bold patterns designed to confuse the enemy.

The latest Dazzle Ship features a design from Turner Prize-nominated artist Ciara Phillips which lit up the city of Edinburgh in style. It’s the fourth Dazzle Ship to be commissioned, and was launched in Scotland on 29 May and 1 June 2016, to mark the centenary of the Battle of Jutland.
Dazzle painting played an important part in the Battle of Jutland according to Sorcha Carey, director of the Edinburgh Art Festival, which co-commissioned Phillips’ artwork with 14-18 NOW, the body involved with organising the centenary arts commissions.
The first artist, Tobias Rehberger from Germany converted the exterior of the warship HMS President (which was docked in London) into a modern combination of pipes and funnels. Following on from him, Venezuelan artist Carlos Cruz-Diez took on a Liverpool pilot vessel and dazzled it in a combination of red, yellow, green and black vertical stripes. Sir Peter Blake created his dazzle by turning a working Mersey ferry into a riot of Pop art.

For more information on mv Fingal (Dazzle Ship) please go to - https://www.1418now.org.uk/commissions/dazzle-ship-scotland-4/.
 
You can view mv Fingal from Ocean Driver, Leith Docks.

Monday, 23 May 2016

What are project cargoes?


Well, aside from being another service provided by t ward shipping, a project cargo is a name for a service that transports large, high value, heavy or critically important pieces of equipment to destinations all around the world, for use in engineering or other types of major project. Project cargo can very often involve moving multiple shipments, and the shipping of several component parts that may need to be taken apart for shipping and then reassembled upon delivery. It’s a service that clearly needs a great deal of attention to detail, meticulous planning and a very well integrated logistics plan.

Here at t ward we are happy to take on every aspect of your project cargo shipping needs. We’ll get stuck in and take the process forward with you, organising everything for you from start to finish. We know that time can be of the essence when dealing with a project cargo shipment so we’ll ensure that everything goes according to plan and contingency plans are in place for any problems that might occur. With our years of experience there’s no need to worry, we’re fully prepared. t.ward shipping have been transporting and shipping project cargo all over in the world for many years and we’ve worked with a wide variety of different industries in that time. Our clients have included:

  •  oil and gas
  •  mining
  •  renewables
  •  agriculture
  •  Food and drinks industry

Whatever the size or complexity of your project, we’ll work closely with you to ensure that we always give you a tailor-made service. Our project cargo services include:

  •  project planning and consulting
  •  site inspections
  •  designing specialist packing cases
  •  export packing and multi-modal transport
  •  heavy-lift and abnormal loads
  •  co-ordinating freight and installation services
  •  witness loading-on-site attendance and dedicated project personnel
  •  arranging break bulk or Ro/Ro shipping rates/terms direct with shipping lines.

T Ward Shipping prides itself on offering bespoke shipping services, so for more information on our project cargo services, or to discuss your requirements, please contact our friendly team and we’ll be delighted to help.

Tuesday, 3 May 2016

Ports we serve - the Port of Ayr

The Port of Ayr, which is conveniently situated on the West Coast of Scotland, and located at the entrance to the Firth of Clyde, is renowned for its convenience and fuss-free access to transport networks around Scotland and the UK. Ayr is an incredibly busy port which plays an important part in Scotland’s import/export industry - an impressive 558,000 tonnes of cargo passed through the port just in 2010 and that figure is rising every year.

Just one of the ports we serve at t. ward shipping, Ayr is the ideal access point to Scotland’s rail networks, and the motorways and trunk roads linking the west coast to the cities of Scotland and Northern England (the M77 for Glasgow, the M8 for Edinburgh, and the M74 for links to Northern England are all within easy reach.)

The Port of Ayr is just half a mile away from the town centre, and is managed from local offices. Along with Troon, Ayr is one of two Scottish harbours operated by Associated British Ports (ABP). The entrance to the port is protected by the detached north breakwater and south pier. The Griffin Dock provides 2000 feet of quay with a depth of 20 feet. Additional berths on the riverside provide a further 1800-plus feet of quay space and have slightly deeper waters - there you’ll find a depth of 22 feet.


Facilities-wise, the Port of Ayr mostly handles salt, aggregates, sand, and animal feed, and the Arran, Kintyre, Carrick and Jura terminals provide around 18,000 sq m of storage for dry bulks. Other cargo handled by Ayr includes a range of minerals (mainly coal and silica), scrap metals and general cargo. The port is also used to import around 200,000 tonnes of forest products per year, and handles imported bulk for the Scottish glass-making industry.

In recent years, Ayr has been used for the delivery of wind turbines, and he location and facilities there make it ideal for any special-project cargoes such as heavy lifts or wind-energy support.

The harbour also has facilities to handle cruise liners, and is popular with cruise operators for its beautiful scenery - and world-leading golf courses. Two pontoons are available at Ayr to accommodate up to two ships' tenders, along with car parking facilities and reception packages available for arriving cruises.

For more information on the services we provide at the Port of Ayr, and advice on your specific requirements, contact our helpful team at t. ward shipping limited.

Tuesday, 12 April 2016

The Port of Methil – Ports we serve

Methil, one of the Scottish ports served by t ward shipping limited, is Forth Ports’ most eastern port, mainly dealing with aggregate, timber, and general bulk commodities. This long established port is surrounded by the deep sheltered water of Largo Bay, which makes it the perfect choice for the specialist services it offers to Methil and the nearby area. The port also has capacity for handling repairs to, maintenance and supply of offshore drilling rigs and tankers.



The first dock at Methil (the Number 1 Dock) opened in May 1887 and in 1889 the North British Railway Company took ownership of the dock. A further dock was then constructed on the site of the tidal harbour in 1900, followed by the much larger Number 3 Dock in 1913. The Number 3 Dock boasted an impressive entrance channel and sea wall along the front of the previous docks, and was a huge feat of engineering undertaking at the time. The third dock was intended to be able to accommodate at least eight hydraulic coal hoists - but only six were ever built.

The port of Methil was once responsible for shipping over three million tonnes of coal every year, and coal has been a major influence on the character and prosperity of this town over the years. From the end of the First World War until the No. 3 Dock was closed down by the Forth Ports Authority in 1977 and coal exports were diverted to Leith, Methil was considered to be Scotland's most important coal port.

During the 1960s, however, the closure of the nearby collieries hit the dock hard. Nowadays there are two working docks available at Leith, which can accommodate vessels up to 3,000 dwt. Leith now specialises in wood pulp and timber distribution, and these two commodities total around 150,000 tonnes a year. The port also handles stone and coal exports, fertiliser imports, and road salt for Fife Council during the winter months.

Methil’s strategic location and range of specialist services should also serve the area well in years to come, as the port is perfectly placed to be able to serve the emerging renewable energy sector.

Tuesday, 29 March 2016

New t ward Partnership with Eurogate

We’re delighted to be able to announce a new partnership between t ward and Eurogate, a partnership that will enable us to serve our customers even better.

Teaming up with Eurogate means that t ward will now be able to offer clients a weekly road freight service to selected destinations in Eastern Europe. Please see the schedule for details of where we will be able to serve.

Eurogate is a well-established group of freight forwarding companies which operates across eight European countries. Founded in 1989, the company has an impressive road-freight forwarding background; it started out as a joint venture between the UK forwarder, MS Shipping, and the Hungarian state-owned road-transport company Hungarocamion.

Eurogate specialises in shipments between Western-European, Central-Eastern European countries and the former Soviet Union, and its FTL coverage includes countries in these regions.

  • Services to and from the UK:Three departures per week to Hungary, Croatia, Slovenia, Serbia, Macedonia, Albania, Bosnia and Slovakia.
  • Two departures per week to Poland, Romania, Bulgaria, Czech Republic and Austria.
  • Weekly departures to Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Russia, Belarus and Ukraine.

OVERLAND GROUPAGE SERVICES


Export Schedule



DestinationDeparturesTransit time/day(s)Close Off Days
Hungary / BudapestTuesday/Friday4Monday/Thursday
Poland / Warsaw   Tuesday/Friday4Monday/Thursday
Czech Rep/ Prague  Friday 4Thursday
Slovakia/ Bratislava Friday 4Thursday
Romania/ Bucharest Friday 7Thursday
Bulgaria/ Sofia Friday 8Thursday
Slovenia/ LjubljanaFriday 4Thursday
Bosnia/ SarajevoFriday 8Thursday
Croatia/ ZagrebFriday7Thursday
Serbia/ BelgradeFriday9Thursday
Latvia/ RigaFriday 5Thursday
Lithuania/ VilniusFriday 5Thursday
Estonia/ TallinnFriday 5Thursday
Russia/ MoscowFriday 7-10Thursday
Ukraine/ KievFriday 7-10Thursday
Uzbekistan/ Tashkent Friday 26 - 30Thursday
Kazakhstan/ Almaty  Friday 26 - 30Thursday
Azerbaijan/ Baku  Friday 26 - 30Thursday
Armenia/ Yerevan Friday 26 - 30Thursday
Georgia/ Tbilisi  Friday 26 - 30Thursday
Turkey/ Istanbul Friday 10 Thursday
Iran / Tehran Friday 21 Thursday

Tuesday, 15 March 2016

Burntisland – Ports we serve

The Port of Burntisland, between Kirkcaldy and North Queensferry, is one of the oldest natural harbours on the Forth, and provides transport and distribution by sea, rail or road all over Scotland. The renewable energy sector along with an upturn in coastal shipping has provided something of a revival for the port, which is also home to Burntisland Fabrications and Briggs Marine.

 In the 21st century Burntisland can enable access for barges of 300ft by 90ft, and the port has been a major Scottish port for centuries, a position which was boosted in 1847 with the Edinburgh and Northern Railway which ran from Burntisland north to Lindores and Cupar. Three years later, the world's first roll-on/roll-off rail ferry service was launched, and was crossing the Firth of Forth from Burntisland to Granton. The service was operational until the Forth Bridge was opened in 1890 when the Forth Bridge opened.

The Burntisland Shipbuilding Company at Burntisland West Dock was founded as an emergency shipyard in 1918, and introduced ‘Burntisland Economy’ steamship in 1929. In the Second World the yard built three Loch class frigates: HMS Loch Killin (K391), HMS Loch Fyne (K429) and HMS Loch Glendhu (K619). The shipyard closed in 1969.

In 2014, Forth Ports Limited and Fife-based Scott Group announced investment into a proposed regeneration of the eastern end of the port. Forth Ports and Scott Group, supported by a Regional Selective Assistance (RSA) grant from Scottish Enterprise, promised to invest around £2.5million in the development of the site, with a view to creating what they called a ‘state-of-the-art pallet manufacturing facility’ – which would include upgrades to the electricity supply, a refurbishment of the existing building and other areas, upgrades to road infrastructure and relocation and installation of new equipment.

For information about Burntisland and other ports we serve at t ward shipping limited, contact us and we’ll be delighted to advise you.